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Mind Your Manners

I am an assertive, jump-right-in-there, no-time-to-mince-words individual. This approach is evident in daily interactions, including text messages and emails. Thank goodness for good friends!

To what, you ask, am I referring? MANNERS. I have some friends who aren’t bothered by my direct approach. However, there are a few who rightfully remind me of the importance of manners when communicating with others, especially when emailing or texting. Maybe you, too, need to conduct an internal evaluation of your manners protocol.

Why is a pleasant acknowledgement important? 

Reason #1:

a. It maintains the standards of basic civility that we’re all entitled. Like ‘please’ and ‘thank you’, these two little words also go a long way towards improving communication and the overall atmosphere.

b.  ’Good morning’ humanizes the recipient.  We’re real people, not just cogs in a pointlessly spinning wheel.  Show some humanity.

c.  Provides for a more democratic environment, a leveled field, where everyone from the Superintendent to the cafeteria worker gets to share in a friendly two-second exchange.

d.  It’s quick (and relatively painless).  If it is painful, you should probably be looking for a new career or scheduling time for some serious self-reflection.

e.  It’s free.

f.  Acknowledging the mere presence of someone is interpersonal communications 101. Don’t YOU want to be noticed? You might tell yourself otherwise, but at the end of the day, we all want to be recognized.  (http://www.jobacle.com/blog/7-reasons-to-say-good-morning-to-your-co-workers.html)

REASON #2

a.  We must teach our students. Based on the way I (and probably those of you reading this) was taught, manners are on the endangered list. ‘Please’, ‘thank you’, ‘yes ma’am’, and ‘no sir’ have fallen by the wayside. I am actually appalled, and a bit miffed, when I pass a person in the hallway or on the street and no glance, nod, or other form of acknowledgement is exchanged.

b.  Manners expressed by our youth garner attention. When a student responds with a ‘yes ma’am’ my ears perk up and I silently thank his/her parents. This child has the evidence of soft skills which will place him/her a rung higher in social settings.

c. We are the examples. I know your plates are already full to the point of regurgitation. However, if it’s in you, and it probably is, it will take little effort on your part to say ‘please’ and ‘thank you’ to your students. It won’t take much to respond to them with a ‘yes ma’am’ or ‘no sir.’ Your classroom may be the ONLY place these words are uttered.

d. Acknowledging the mere presence of someone is interpersonal communications 101. Don’t YOU want to be noticed? You might tell yourself otherwise, but at the end of the day, we all want to be recognized, especially those young ones whose lives we influence in a lasting way.

 

 

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